Sept 19-20 Weekend Outlook – Beautiful early fall weather!

A cold front swept through the region this morning, resulting in very comfortable fall-like temperatures today.  So far today, the high at DIA has been a very comfortable 72F, with generally low 70s common for highs across the Denver metro area.  Gusty winds out of the northeast fueled a wildfire that developed earlier this afternoon near Greeley, however.  We’re looking at a great weekend weather-wise across Colorado with warming temperatures and generally dry weather.  Also, the fall colors are really starting to go off on the high country, with some areas near peak already.  This weekend through next weekend will likely be the best time to catch the golden aspen trees in all of their glory.

On Saturday, temperatures will start off chilly with low 40s in Denver and 30s for the mountains (probably well into the 20s for the usual high elevation cold spots such as Fraser).  However, it will warm up nicely with highs reaching the mid 70s across the Denver area and 50s and 60s in the mountains.  The high resolution NAM model paints a good picture of high temperatures across the state tomorrow.  There will be some scattered cumulus tomorrow afternoon, owing to a weak upper level disturbance moving across the state.  However, dry conditions are expected for most of the state with the possible exceptions being the Southern Sangre de Christo Mountains near the New Mexico border and the far eastern plains.

NAM 4k model projected high temperatures for Saturday Sept 19

NAM 4k model projected high temperatures for Saturday Sept 19

 

The Broncos played on the road against Kansas City on Thursday night (and won a thriller, 31-24!!), but the annual rivalry game between Colorado and Colorado State will be played at Sports Authority Field at Mile High at 5:00 pm on Saturday.  Here is a look at the gameday forecast below:

Colorado vs. Colorado State Forecast – 5:00 pm in Denver

Pre-game Tailgate Weather:

  • Temps – Mid 40s rising to mid 70s
  • Wind – S/SE 3-8 mph
  • Conditions – Mostly Sunny/Partly Cloudy

Gametime Weather:

  • Temps – Mid 70s falling to low 60s
  • Wind – S/SE 3-8 mph
  • Conditions – Partly Cloudy

 

Sunday, temperatures will warm another few degrees with highs topping out near 80 across the Denver area with even drier air working its way into Colorado, resulting in more abundant sunshine statewide.  Should be a great day to get outside, whether its to hike and photograph the aspens or to get in a round of golf.  Early next week, temperatures are going to be very warm as high pressure builds, with well-above average readings in the mid 80s across the plains.  A potentially wet period could actually be in store for western Colorado on Wednesday and Thursday as a low pressure system and remnants from a tropical system work its way into the Four Corners region, but for now it appears the I-25 corridor east of the Continental Divide will remain on the drier side with just isolated shower/storm chances.

Enjoy the beautiful weather this weekend!

Fire danger increasing across parts of Colorado this week

Thanks to an abnormally wet spring and early summer, wildfires have not been much of an issue for Colorado so far this year.  But after a few weeks of much drier weather, that is beginning to change with fire danger increasing significantly this week.  In fact, the NWS has issued a Fire Weather Watch for parts of eastern Colorado on Tuesday, including Colorado Springs, the Palmer Divide, and Douglas County.  We have just experienced our first week of post-monsoonal extended dry weather of the early fall season, and the stretch of dry weather will continue across the eastern half of Colorado.  An upper level trough of low pressure is deepening across the Pacific Northwest early this week, leading to a shift in upper level winds from northwesterly to southwesterly.  This developing trough will drive a bit of mid to upper level moisture into western Colorado, leading to scattered showers and thunderstorms across the mountains west of the Continental Divide over the next few days.

At the surface, a center of high pressure will be located over southwest Colorado through midweek, while a trough of low pressure will be located over the plains of eastern Colorado.  Surface winds flow from high pressure toward low pressure, so this setup favors downsloping winds off of the Continental Divide/Front Range crest which has a localized drying effect downwind of the mountains – as air moves downslope, it compresses, warms, and dries out (the rain-shadow effect).  This surface setup (western CO ridge, eastern CO trough) can be seen in the image below of GFS model projected sea-level pressure on Wednesday.  Notice how the only projected precipitation remains west of the Continental Divide, with dry conditions east of the Divide.

 

Image Source: WeatherBell

Image Source: WeatherBell

 

The surface pressure gradient between the high pressure center and low pressure center generates what is known as the pressure gradient force, which is a primary driver of the wind – all else equal, the tighter the surface pressure gradient, the faster the wind speeds.  This effect is further enhanced as air is forced downslope from a mountain barrier.  As a result, this setup over the next few days is going to generate breezy conditions across eastern Colorado, which will further enhance the fire danger – especially across the Palmer Divide and eastern plains.  Here is the WRF model projected sustained wind speeds and directions for Tuesday afternoon.

 

Screen Shot 2015-09-14 at 12.33.58 PM

Image source: Colorado Avalanche Information Center

 

Most importantly, relative humidity values are going to be very low east of the Continental Divide over the next couple of days – down into the low teens across much of the area (image below is NAM model projected relative humidity on Tuesday).  The one saving grace is that vegetation is fairly healthy this year after a wet spring/summer, although it is likely beginning to dry out after below average rainfall over the past month.  Grasses and shrubs that have dried out will be especially susceptible, so please be careful over the next couple of days – grass and brush fires tend to spread very quickly.

Image Source: WeatherBell

Image Source: WeatherBell

 

Aside from the increasing fire danger, temperatures will continue to be very warm to start the week.  Denver could threaten its record high today of 92 degrees, which was set in 1948.  Average high for September 14 is 79.  Temperatures will gradually cool over the next couple of days, but still be well above average for mid September.  On Thursday, a cold front will arrive as the trough of low pressure sweeps across the central and northern Rockies, leading to more comfortable temperatures in the 70s on Thursday and Friday.  However, it looks like we could warm back up into the 80s again by the weekend.  Dry conditions are expected to continue for the most part through the end of the week.  The high country will be drying out by the end of the week as well once the trough moves east of the Rockies.

 

Broncos Game Day Weather Forecast

Ridge of high pressure will be centered over Colorado today resulting in well above normal temperatures, dry weather and sunny to mostly sunny skies. Highs will reach the lower 90s with surface winds from the W to NW this afternoon in the 5-15mph range. Normal high for Denver today is 80 degrees and the record high is 96. Relative humidity values will be dipping into the single digits when temperatures are at or above 90 degrees indicative of a very dry air mass. Weather will not be an issue during the game today, GO BRONCOS!!!

Sept 12-13 Football Gameday Forecasts

We’re heading into the second weekend of September, and with that, football season is back in full swing!  College football started last weekend, and pro football begins this weekend with the Broncos’ opening the season at home on Sunday against the Baltimore Ravens.  Colorado, Colorado State, and Air Force all have home games on Saturday as well.  In general, the weather forecast is going to be favorable for football fans this weekend, at least in terms of not having any precipitation chances, but it will be quite warm during the afternoons.  Here is a closer look at the weekend games.

 

Colorado vs. Massachusetts – Saturday at noon in Boulder

The Buffaloes look to rebound in their home opener following a disappointing season-opening loss to Hawaii.  Conditions should generally be beautiful for this game in Boulder, although sunscreen will definitely be necessary with mostly sunny skies and high temps in the low 80s.  Tailgating will start with morning temps in the 50s.

Pre-game Tailgate Weather:

  • Temps – Mid 50s rising to low 70s
  • Wind – N/NE 0-5 mph
  • Conditions – Mostly Sunny

Gametime Weather:

  • Temps – Mid 70s rising to low 80s
  • Wind – NE 3-7 mph
  • Conditions – Mostly Sunny/Partly Cloudy

 

Colorado State vs. Minnesota – Saturday at 1:30 in Ft. Collins

The Rams are 1-0 after an easy season-opening win over Savannah State, and will have a chance to bring home a solid win against a mid-tier Big Ten opponent and build on last year’s 10-win season.  Weather conditions will generally be excellent, although it’ll be a little on the warm side with highs in the mid 80s.  Bring your sunscreen!

Pre-Game Tailgate Weather:

  • Temps – Low 50s rising to near 80
  • Wind – N/NE 2-6 mph
  • Conditions – Mostly Sunny

Gametime Weather:

  • Temps – Low to mid 80s
  • Wind – E 3-7 mph
  • Conditions – Mostly Sunny

 

Air Force vs. San Jose State – Saturday at 8:15 pm in Colorado Springs

Air Force gets a late game on Saturday with an after-sunset gametime.  Weather conditions look to be about perfect with a high in the mid to upper 70s during the day for tailgating, and lows dipping into the low 50s Saturday night.

Pre-Game Tailgate Weather:

  • Temps – Mid to upper 70s during the afternoon
  • Wind – N/NE 6-12 mph
  • Conditions – Mostly Sunny

Gametime Weather:

  • Temps – Mid 60s falling to upper 50s
  • Wind – S/SW 4-8 mph
  • Conditions – Mostly Clear

 

Denver Broncos vs. Baltimore Ravens – Sunday at 2:25 pm

The Broncos have a big game to open the season against a Baltimore Ravens team that has become a bit of a rival in recent seasons.  With a new head coach and an aging Peyton Manning, there are plenty of question marks surrounding the Broncos heading into the season, some of which should be answered in this first game.  The home-opener is looking dry but hot with high temps topping out near 90.  Water and sunscreen will be a good idea if attending the game.  Go Broncos!

Pre-Game Tailgate Weather:

  • Temps – Upper 50s rising to upper 80s
  • Wind – W/NW 4-8 mph
  • Conditions – Mostly Sunny

Gametime Weather:

  • Temps – Upper 80s to near 90
  • Wind – NW 4-8 mph
  • Conditions – Mostly Sunny/Partly Cloudy

 

Weekend Mountain Outlook

Maybe you’re heading up to the high country this weekend rather than catching a football game?  Well, the weather is looking near-perfect in the mountains this weekend, with no thunderstorms expected and mostly clear skies with comfortable temperatures.  A typical early-fall pattern of warm days and cool nights is expected with most mountain towns in the low to mid 70s during the day and low 40s at night, although some of the higher elevation valleys will see morning temps near freezing.  Fall colors should be starting to come out as well, although we’re still a week or two away from when colors will be peaking.

 

 

An extended dry period with beautiful early fall weather

We’re undergoing a significant pattern change to a drier, more fall-like pattern across Colorado.  This will finally put an end to those pesky pop-up showers and thunderstorms that persisted through Labor Day weekend.  This morning’s water vapor satellite image shows much drier air working its way into Colorado from the west, while the trough of low pressure responsible for our unsettled weekend weather moves off to the east.  High pressure will dominate our weather over the next 7 days, with a dry northwesterly flow aloft.  Notice Hurricane Linda located near the Baja of Mexico.  This will not have an impact on our weather, but will actually bring some moisture into the far southwestern U.S. and result in thunderstorms and localized heavy rainfall across the mountains of Southern California.

 

wv-1

The upper level pattern over the next week will be a ridge of high pressure over the western U.S. and a trough of low pressure over the eastern U.S.  Temperatures are generally going to be close to seasonal averages over the next week, with some minor fluctuations – low 80s for highs and low 50s for lows in Denver.  The average high and low for September 8 in Denver are 82/51.  By mid month the average drops to 79/48, and by the 30th it drops to 72/42.

 

Screen Shot 2015-09-08 at 12.12.12 PM

Most notably, we aren’t expecting any appreciable rainfall across the Denver area for the next week.  Check out NOAA’s QPF (quantitative precipitation forecast) outlook for a good “first-glance” look at the next 7 days.  I don’t believe there has been an essentially dry 7-day outlook for the majority of Colorado since March.  The only precipitation showing up across far SE Colorado will likely occur today where a little bit of moisture remains, and across the far eastern side of the state on Thursday as a cold front moves through.  On the other hand, the eastern half of the nation is looking quite wet this week – owing to the slow-moving trough of low pressure.

p168i

Bottom line, get outside and enjoy the near-perfect weather over the next week.  September through about mid October is typically one of the nicest times of year in Colorado, and this week will follow that theme.  If you’re planning a trip to the high country, nights are going to be getting much cooler, with some of the higher elevation valleys likely to experience near freezing temperatures.  Over the next month, the fall colors will be starting to put on a show in the mountains.  In fact, some early color was already showing up this past weekend.  Also, the weather is looking excellent, if not a bit warm, for the Broncos’ season opener on Sunday against the Baltimore Ravens.  Mostly sunny skies with highs in the mid 80s likely for gametime, following morning temps in the 50s – not bad for tailgating!

 

 

Labor Day weekend snow for higher elevations of the Northern Rockies

The higher elevations of Idaho and Montana received their first appreciable snowfall of the season on Saturday!  A deep trough of low pressure has been situated along the Pacific Northwest for the past week and has slowly been progressing inland, ushering in much colder, fall-like air in its wake.

Source: College of DuPage

Source: College of DuPage

The Cascades in Washington saw their first taste of winter on Friday when several inches of snow fell above 6,000 ft. in Mt. Rainier National Park.  Precipitation over the past week in the Northwest has been very welcome and has put a major dent into the large fires that have been impacting the region in recent weeks.

 

Snapshot(4)

 

Saturday, the Northern Rockies from Central Idaho into Western Montana received accumulating snowfall as well.  The two images below were from Brundage Ski Area in Idaho and the Mission Mountains north of Missoula, MT.

 

Snapshot(2)

 

Snapshot(3)

 

By the time the cold front reached Wyoming, moisture was more limited, but very chilly air for early September arrived behind the front across the Tetons and Yellowstone.  Low temperatures recorded in Northwest Wyoming this morning include 26F at Yellowstone Lake, 22F at south entrance to Yellowstone, 19F at the Lower Saddle below the Grand Teton, and 16F in the town of Bondurant!

Here in Colorado, we will see very little impact temperature-wise from this system as the trough just brushes us to the north.  A weak cold front did move across the state this morning, but temperatures will continue to run on the mild side for early September over the next several days – although more comfortable with Denver temps in the mid 80s, as opposed to the temps in the 90s we saw last week.  We are undergoing a drying trend, however, following a weak late summer monsoonal flow over the past week.  The mountains have seen more of an impact lately than the urban corridor and adjacent plains, where more stable air has been in place.  But even today, the high country is much drier compared to Friday and Saturday, with only very isolated showers and storms statewide for Sunday afternoon and Monday.

On Tuesday, a much drier pattern will take hold across the state as a dry northwesterly flow squashes any remaining monsoonal moisture over the state.  This is a fairly typical drying trend for this time of year, when afternoon thunderstorms become much less common.  On Thursday afternoon, a stronger cold front will arrive from the north, which could trigger a few thunderstorms along the Front Range.  However, the bigger story will be the cooler temperatures arriving.  This will likely be our first real fall cold front of the season (aside from a couple of brief cool-downs in August), with high temperatures currently projected in the lower 70’s in Denver on Friday!

 

 

Denver March Climate Preview

Each month the NWS in Boulder releases a monthly climate preview.  Below is the March 2015 Climate preview and can be found on the web by clicking here.
MARCH IN DENVER IS TYPICALLY A TRANSITION MONTH WHERE THE DRY WINTER SEASON ENDS AND THE MOIST SEASON BEGINS. THE PHRASE, “IF YOU DON’T LIKE THE WEATHER, JUST WAIT 5 MINUTES”, CAN OFTEN BE USED IN DENVER DURING THE SPRING MONTHS WITH MARCH INCLUDED. MARCH OFTEN PROVIDES A WIDE VARIATION OF WEATHER AND TEMPERATURE RANGES. OUTDOOR ENTHUSIST CAN ENJOY DEEP POWDER AT HIGHER ELEVATIONS WEST OF THE URBAN COORIDOR AND RETURN BACK TO SPRINGLIKE TEMPERATURES IN THE 70S.
AN EXAMPLE OF VARIABLE AND FAST CHANGING WEATHER IN THE DENVER AREA IS WHEN CANADIAN COLD FRONTS OCCASIONALLY CLASH WITH RELATIVELY WARM AND MOIST GULF MOISTURE TO PRODUCE SEVERE WEATHER AHEAD OF SIGNIFICANT SNOW STORMS. THE MONTHLY NORMAL SNOWFALL CAN BE FREQUENTLY REACHED IN A SINGLE STORM SYSTEM LASTING 1 TO 3 DAYS. IN ADDITION, WHETHER THE PRECIPITATION IS RAIN OR SNOW, MARCH’S NORMAL PRECIPITATION NEARLY TRIPLES THAT OF FEBRUARY’S NORMALS.
DENVER’S MONTHLY MEAN TEMPERATURE FOR MARCH IS 40.4 DEGREES (1981-2010 AVERAGES) AND IS DENVER’S 5TH COLDEST MONTH OF THE YEAR BEHIND DECEMBER, JANUARY, FEBRUARY AND NOVEMBER RESPECTIVELY. MARCH STARTS THE MONTH WITH A NORMAL HIGH OF 50 DEGREES AND ENDS WITH A NORMAL HIGH OF 58 DEGREES. FOR LOW TEMPERATURES, THE MONTH BEGINS WITH A NORMAL OF 22 DEGREES AND FINISHES WITH A NORMAL OF 30.
THE WARMEST TEMPERATURE EVER RECORDED DURING THE MONTH OF MARCH, SINCE RECORDS BEGAN IN 1872, WAS 84 DEGREES ON THE 26TH DAY OF 1971. MARCH’S COLDEST TEMPERATURE EVER RECORDED IN DENVER WAS -11 DEGREES AND OCCURED ON THE 28TH DAY OF 1886.
MARCH: DENVER’S TOP 10 COLDEST (MEAN TEMPERATURES):
26.4 DEGREES 1912
27.7         1924
29.0         1965
29.7         1906
32.1         1969
32.2         1891
32.8         1958
33.0         1964
33.1         1899
33.2         1917
MARCH: DENVER’S TOP 10 WARMEST (MEAN TEMPERATURES):
50.4 DEGREES 1910
49.2         1912
47.2         1907
47.1         1986
47.0         1918
46.5         1879
46.4         2004
46.4         1946
46.0         2007
46.0         1887
FOR DENVER’S NINE MONTH SNOW PERIOD OF SEPTEMBER THROUGH MAY, MARCH RANKS AS THE SNOWIEST MONTH AND TYPICALLY ACCOUNTS FOR 20 PERCENT OF THE ANNUAL SNOWFALL. DENVER NORMALLY COLLECTS 10.7 INCHES OF SNOW IN MARCH BASED ON AVERAGES FROM OLD STAPLETON INTL AIRPORT (1981-2010 AVERAGES), HOWEVER MARCH IS KNOWN FOR THE BIGGEST SNOWFALL EVENTS TO HIT THE REGION. IN RECENT HISTORY FOR EXAMPLE, MARCH 1992 AND 2003 COME TO MIND FOR MOST. MARCH 1992 BROUGHT TORNADO WARNINGS OVER THE NORTHEASTERN COLORADO PLAINS AS A FAST PACED COLD FRONT ROLLED ACROSS THE PLAINS. THIS AIRMASS COLLISION WAS FOLLOWED BY A WINTER STORM WARNING ALONG THE ENTIRE FRONT RANGE DURING THE EVENING AND INTO THE NEXT DAY AS THE STORM DEVELOPED OVER THE STATE AND MOVED EAST. IN 2003, THE 2ND BIGGEST SNOWFALL IN DENVER WEATHER HISTORY OCCURRED AS A MASSIVE TROUGH OF LOW PRESSURE TAPPED INTO GULF MOISTURE. THE AREA OF PRECIPITATION ASSOCIATED WITH THE MULTI DAY SNOW STORM EXTENDED IN A 150-300 MILE WIDE BAND FROM THE CONTINENTAL DIVIDE WEST OF DENVER, SOUTHEASTWARD 1200 MILES INTO LOUISIANA.
MARCH: DENVER’S SNOWIEST
35.2 INCHES 2003
32.5        1944
31.3        1891
30.5        1983
29.2        1961
26.8        1959
25.7        1923
25.2        1952
24.8        1929
24.0        1981
ON THE FLIPSIDE OF BIG AND EVENFUL SNOWSTORMS COUPLED WITH THE ONSET OF THE UNSTABLE CONVECTIVE SEASON, THE END OF THE WINTER CAN OCCASIONALLY EXPERIENCE EXTENDED DROUGHT-LIKE CONDITIONS OVER THE HIGH PLAINS REGION. THESE DRY PERIODS ARE OFTEN ASSOCIATED WITH LA NINA PHASES OF THE PACIFIC OCEANIC REGION. THE DRIEST MARCHS USUALLY END THE MONTH WITH ABOVE NORMAL MONTHLY TEMPERATURES MAINLY DUE TO WINDY, CLOUD FREE, DOWNSLOPE WINDY DAYS COMBINED WITH WARMER NIGHT-TIME LOW TEMPERATURES FROM LACK OF LONG LASTING SNOW COVER. THIS WAS THE CASE IN 2012 WHERE DENVER HAD RECORD LOW PRECIPITATION, RECORD LOW SNOWFALL AND A THE SECONDS HIGHEST MONTHLY TEMPERATURE IN 141 YEARS.
MARCH: DENVER’S LEAST SNOWIEST
 T INCHES 2012
 T         1995
 0.3        1883
 0.4        1911
 0.5        1885
 1.1        1887
 1.8        2004
 2.0        1882
 2.1        1982
 2.1        1908
                    …THE OUTLOOK FOR MARCH 2015…
AFTER A TOP 5 SNOWIEST FEBRUARY IN WHICH MOST OF THE SNOW ARRIVED IN THE SECOND HAVE OF THE MONTH, THE FIRST WEEK OF MARCH 2015 IS EXPECTED TO BE A CONTINUATION OF COLD MOIST AND UNSETTLED. FOR THE REMAINDER OF MARCH 2015, THE MID TO LONG RANGE INDICATIONS POINT TO NEAR NORMAL TEMPERATURES AND PRECIPITATION WITH A SLIGHT BIAS TOWARD ABOVE NORMAL PRECIPITATION. WITH MARCH BEING THE SNOWIEST MONTH IN DENVER, COMBINED WITH A WEAK EL NINO ENVIRONMENT IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN, WE CAN EXPECT MOST WEATHER DISTURBANCES WHICH MOVE INTO COLORADO TO PROVIDE MEASURABLE MOISTURE.
                       …MARCH STATISTICS…
…TEMPERATURES (1981-2010 NORMALS)…
AVERAGE HIGH……………………… 54.4
AVERAGE LOW………………………. 26.4
MONTHLY MEAN……………………… 40.4
DAYS WITH HIGH 90 OR ABOVE………….   0
DAYS WITH HIGH 32 OR BELOW………….   2 (1.9)
DAYS WITH LOW 32 OR BELOW………….. 24 (23.6)
DAYS WITH LOWS ZERO OR BELOW………..   0 (0.1)
…PRECIPITATION…
MONTHLY MEAN………………………   0.92 INCH
DAYS WITH MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION…..   6 (5.9)
AVERAGE SNOWFALL…………………… 10.7 INCHES (SNOWIEST
                                                       MONTH)
…MISCELLANEOUS MARCH AVERAGES…
HEATING DEGREE DAYS……………….. 763
COOLING DEGREE DAYS………………..    0
WIND SPEED (MPH)…………………..    9.7*
WIND DIRECTION……………………. SOUTH*
DAYS WITH THUNDERSTORMS…………….    0* (0.3)
DAYS WITH DENSE FOG………………..    1* (1.1)
PERCENT OF SUNSHINE………………..   69*
(NOTE: SUNSHINE DATA ARE NO LONGER REPORTED AS OF OCTOBER 1, 2009)
* = 1971-2002 NORMALS
…MARCH EXTREMES…
RECORD HIGH………………………. 84 DEGREES ON 3/26/1971
RECORD LOW……………………….. -11 DEGREES ON 3/28/1886
WARMEST………………………….. 50.4 DEGREES IN 1910
MAXIMUM/MINIMUM COOLING DEGREES DAYS… NONE EVER RECORDED
COLDEST………………………….. 26.4 DEGREES IN 1912
MAXIMUM HEATING DEGREE DAYS………… 1198 IN 1912
MINIMUM HEATING DEGREE DAYS…………   452 IN 1910
WETTEST…………………………..   4.56 INCHES IN 1983
DRIEST……………………………   0.11 INCHES IN 1908

Colorado Snowfall Totals

The last round of snow for NE Colorado produced a wide range of accumulations.  Below are the local storm reports from the NWS in Boulder:

0815 AM     HEAVY SNOW       1 WNW ELDORADO SPRINGS  39.93N 105.28W
03/04/2015  M8.1 INCH        BOULDER            CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0804 AM     SNOW             2 S STERLING            40.62N 103.22W
03/04/2015  M1.1 INCH        LOGAN              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0800 AM     SNOW             EVERGREEN               39.63N 105.34W
03/04/2015  M1.0 INCH        JEFFERSON          CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0800 AM     SNOW             10 NE KUTCH             39.00N 103.74W
03/04/2015  M1.0 INCH        ELBERT             CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0800 AM     SNOW             JULESBURG               40.99N 102.26W
03/04/2015  M1.0 INCH        SEDGWICK           CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0800 AM     SNOW             LAKEWOOD                39.70N 105.11W
03/04/2015  M2.3 INCH        JEFFERSON          CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0800 AM     SNOW             5 S SEDGWICK            39.36N 104.97W
03/04/2015  M3.0 INCH        DOUGLAS            CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0800 AM     SNOW             3 SSW TINY TOWN         39.56N 105.24W
03/04/2015  M1.0 INCH        JEFFERSON          CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0750 AM     SNOW             BAILEY                  39.40N 105.47W
03/04/2015  M1.0 INCH        PARK               CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0745 AM     SNOW             6 N WESTMINSTER         39.97N 105.05W
03/04/2015  M2.0 INCH        BROOMFIELD         CO   AMATEUR RADIO

0745 AM     SNOW             2 WSW BYERS             39.70N 104.26W
03/04/2015  M5.5 INCH        ARAPAHOE           CO   AMATEUR RADIO

0745 AM     SNOW             5 WNW BRIGHTON          40.01N 104.88W
03/04/2015  M2.0 INCH        WELD               CO   AMATEUR RADIO

0745 AM     SNOW             4 WNW CONIFER           39.54N 105.37W
03/04/2015  M0.5 INCH        JEFFERSON          CO   AMATEUR RADIO

0745 AM     SNOW             6 NW GREELEY            40.48N 104.82W
03/04/2015  M2.0 INCH        WELD               CO   AMATEUR RADIO

0745 AM     SNOW             HYGIENE                 40.18N 105.17W
03/04/2015  M2.2 INCH        BOULDER            CO   AMATEUR RADIO

0745 AM     SNOW             1 N LAFAYETTE           40.01N 105.10W
03/04/2015  M3.0 INCH        BOULDER            CO   AMATEUR RADIO

0745 AM     SNOW             3 SSE MORRISON          39.61N 105.16W
03/04/2015  M2.2 INCH        JEFFERSON          CO   AMATEUR RADIO

0745 AM     SNOW             2 SSE ENGLEWOOD         39.62N 104.98W
03/04/2015  M3.0 INCH        ARAPAHOE           CO   AMATEUR RADIO

0740 AM     SNOW             NORTHGLENN              39.91N 104.98W
03/04/2015  M1.2 INCH        ADAMS              CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0738 AM     SNOW             ENGLEWOOD               39.65N 104.99W
03/04/2015  M3.0 INCH        ARAPAHOE           CO   PUBLIC

0735 AM     SNOW             1 SSE WELLINGTON        40.69N 104.99W
03/04/2015  M2.5 INCH        LARIMER            CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0731 AM     SNOW             3 NW DENVER             39.76N 105.00W
03/04/2015  M2.3 INCH        DENVER             CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0730 AM     SNOW             7 W ARVADA              39.82N 105.24W
03/04/2015  M1.0 INCH        JEFFERSON          CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0730 AM     SNOW             DENVER                  39.73N 104.96W
03/04/2015  M2.7 INCH        DENVER             CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0730 AM     SNOW             CHEESMAN RESERVOIR      39.21N 105.27W
03/04/2015  M1.0 INCH        DOUGLAS            CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0730 AM     SNOW             ANTERO RESERVOIR        38.99N 105.89W
03/04/2015  M1.0 INCH        PARK               CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0730 AM     SNOW             GRANT                   39.45N 105.67W
03/04/2015  M1.0 INCH        PARK               CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0728 AM     SNOW             NIWOT                   40.10N 105.16W
03/04/2015  M2.5 INCH        BOULDER            CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0716 AM     SNOW             2 N LONGMONT            40.20N 105.11W
03/04/2015  M2.0 INCH        BOULDER            CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0715 AM     SNOW             4 E PINECLIFFE          39.94N 105.35W
03/04/2015  M4.0 INCH        BOULDER            CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

            GROSS RESERVOIR

0702 AM     SNOW             3 SE DENVER             39.69N 104.93W
03/04/2015  M2.3 INCH        DENVER             CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0700 AM     HEAVY SNOW       5 SSW BELLVUE           40.56N 105.21W
03/04/2015  M6.5 INCH        LARIMER            CO   COCORAHS

0700 AM     HEAVY SNOW       11 SE ESTES PARK        40.26N 105.37W
03/04/2015  M6.3 INCH        BOULDER            CO   COCORAHS

0700 AM     HEAVY SNOW       2 S BOULDER             40.00N 105.25W
03/04/2015  M6.2 INCH        BOULDER            CO   COCORAHS

0700 AM     HEAVY SNOW       3 NNW HORSETOOTH MOUNTA 40.58N 105.21W
03/04/2015  M6.0 INCH        LARIMER            CO   COCORAHS

0700 AM     HEAVY SNOW       5 W BELLVUE             40.63N 105.27W
03/04/2015  M6.0 INCH        LARIMER            CO   COCORAHS

0700 AM     SNOW             5 NE BYERS              39.76N 104.16W
03/04/2015  M4.7 INCH        ADAMS              CO   COCORAHS

0700 AM     SNOW             3 ESE AURORA            39.68N 104.76W
03/04/2015  M4.0 INCH        ARAPAHOE           CO   COCORAHS

0700 AM     SNOW             5 WSW LOVELAND          40.39N 105.16W
03/04/2015  M3.6 INCH        LARIMER            CO   COCORAHS

0700 AM     SNOW             4 SSE WATKINS           39.70N 104.57W
03/04/2015  M4.5 INCH        ARAPAHOE           CO   COCORAHS

0700 AM     SNOW             5 N LYONS               40.30N 105.27W
03/04/2015  M3.5 INCH        LARIMER            CO   COCORAHS

0700 AM     SNOW             5 WSW HUDSON            40.04N 104.73W
03/04/2015  M2.5 INCH        WELD               CO   COCORAHS

0700 AM     SNOW             5 SW GREELEY            40.37N 104.81W
03/04/2015  M2.1 INCH        WELD               CO   COCORAHS

0700 AM     SNOW             3 SSW HILLROSE          40.28N 103.54W
03/04/2015  M2.0 INCH        MORGAN             CO   COCORAHS

0700 AM     SNOW             1 WSW KEN CARYL         39.57N 105.13W
03/04/2015  M3.5 INCH        JEFFERSON          CO   COCORAHS

0700 AM     SNOW             6 SSW KASSLER           39.40N 105.12W
03/04/2015  M2.0 INCH        DOUGLAS            CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

            STRONTIA SPRINGS DAM

0700 AM     SNOW             1 SSE ESTES PARK        40.36N 105.51W
03/04/2015  M3.4 INCH        LARIMER            CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0700 AM     SNOW             HOLYOKE                 40.58N 102.30W
03/04/2015  M1.1 INCH        PHILLIPS           CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0700 AM     SNOW             NORTHGLENN              39.91N 104.98W
03/04/2015  M2.5 INCH        ADAMS              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0700 AM     SNOW             7 NNE VIRGINIA DALE     41.04N 105.30W
03/04/2015  M2.4 INCH        ALBANY             WY   CO-OP OBSERVER

0700 AM     SNOW             HEREFORD                40.97N 104.30W
03/04/2015  M1.0 INCH        WELD               CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0700 AM     SNOW             RUSTIC                  40.70N 105.57W
03/04/2015  M2.0 INCH        LARIMER            CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0700 AM     SNOW             4 WSW THURMAN           39.57N 103.29W
03/04/2015  M2.5 INCH        WASHINGTON         CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0700 AM     SNOW             3 WSW CONIFER           39.50N 105.35W
03/04/2015  M0.5 INCH        JEFFERSON          CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0700 AM     SNOW             DILLON                  39.62N 106.04W
03/04/2015  M2.0 INCH        SUMMIT             CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0700 AM     SNOW             8 SW LAKE GEORGE        38.90N 105.48W
03/04/2015  M2.0 INCH        PARK               CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0700 AM     SNOW             LINDON                  39.73N 103.40W
03/04/2015  M2.0 INCH        WASHINGTON         CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0659 AM     SNOW             1 SW WESTMINSTER        39.87N 105.06W
03/04/2015  M2.1 INCH        JEFFERSON          CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0655 AM     HEAVY SNOW       1 E BUCKHORN MOUNTAIN   40.61N 105.31W
03/04/2015  E10.1 INCH       LARIMER            CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0646 AM     SNOW             3 N BAILEY              39.45N 105.46W
03/04/2015  M1.4 INCH        PARK               CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0636 AM     SNOW             4 ENE NEDERLAND         39.98N 105.44W
03/04/2015  M2.0 INCH        BOULDER            CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0636 AM     SNOW             2 WNW AURORA            39.71N 104.85W
03/04/2015  M3.0 INCH        ARAPAHOE           CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0630 AM     SNOW             CROOK                   40.86N 102.80W
03/04/2015  M1.0 INCH        LOGAN              CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0630 AM     SNOW             HUGO                    39.13N 103.47W
03/04/2015  M1.5 INCH        LINCOLN            CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0630 AM     SNOW             FEDERAL HEIGHTS         39.87N 105.02W
03/04/2015  M2.0 INCH        ADAMS              CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

0615 AM     SNOW             1 SSW LAFAYETTE         39.99N 105.10W
03/04/2015  M3.0 INCH        BOULDER            CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0602 AM     SNOW             5 NE NORTHGLENN         39.96N 104.91W
03/04/2015  M2.3 INCH        ADAMS              CO   NWS EMPLOYEE

0600 AM     SNOW             3 SSE SILVER PLUME      39.66N 105.71W
03/04/2015  M1.5 INCH        CLEAR CREEK        CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0600 AM     SNOW             5 WNW FORT MORGAN       40.29N 103.88W
03/04/2015  M1.5 INCH        MORGAN             CO   COCORAHS

0600 AM     SNOW             7 NE DENVER             39.80N 104.87W
03/04/2015  M2.6 INCH        DENVER             CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

            STAPLETON

0600 AM     SNOW             6 NNE WOODROW           40.06N 103.54W
03/04/2015  M1.2 INCH        MORGAN             CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0500 AM     SNOW             3 W DENVER INTL AIRPORT 39.87N 104.73W
03/04/2015  M2.1 INCH        DENVER             CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0500 AM     SNOW             3 SSW BOULDER           39.99N 105.27W
03/04/2015  M5.5 INCH        BOULDER            CO   NWS EMPLOYEE

0500 AM     SNOW             4 E FORT COLLINS        40.56N 104.99W
03/04/2015  M2.6 INCH        LARIMER            CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

0330 AM     SNOW             1 NNW LOUISVILLE        39.99N 105.15W
03/04/2015  M1.9 INCH        BOULDER            CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

1200 AM     SNOW             3 E DENVER              39.73N 104.91W
03/04/2015  M2.0 INCH        DENVER             CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

            DENVER MUSEUM OF NATURE AND SCIENCE

1200 AM     SNOW             13 ENE NUNN             40.78N 104.55W
03/04/2015  M1.4 INCH        WELD               CO   TRAINED SPOTTER

1200 AM     SNOW             3 SW GOLDEN             39.71N 105.25W
03/04/2015  M2.4 INCH        JEFFERSON          CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

1159 PM     SNOW             3 ENE FORT COLLINS      40.58N 105.02W
03/03/2015  M1.9 INCH        LARIMER            CO   CO-OP OBSERVER

1159 PM     SNOW             DENVER INTL AIRPORT     39.87N 104.67W
03/03/2015  M1.9 INCH        DENVER             CO   OFFICIAL NWS OBS

Denver Breaks February Snowfall Record from 1912

February of 2015 was a snowy month in Denver to say the least.  22.4″ of snow was measured at DIA which broke a long standing record of 22.1″ set in 1912.  Many areas of the Denver suburbs received much higher amounts of snow in February with Boulder topping the list at over 45″ of snow for the month.  Most locations received nearly half of a season of snow in just one month!

Broncos Game Day Weather Forecast

Conditions will be dry to start the day on Sunday but a storm system will be moving in during the afternoon and evening which may produce some snow shower activity during the latter part of the game. Clouds will be on the increase through the afternoon with temperatures in the 40s falling into the 30s after 3pm as a cold front moves through turning winds to the E then NE. Chances for rain/mix/snow start at around 3pm with any rain quickly changing over to snow as temperatures continue to drop. Chances for snow increase each hour after 3pm with snow becoming likely by the end of the game. No meaningful snow accumulations are expected during the game mainly trace but up to a tenth of an inch or two cannot be completely ruled out. Winds will increase in the afternoon but are expected to be in the 5-15mph range from the E/NE. GO BRONCOS!!!