The Weather Wire

 

January 2006                                                                                                            Volume 14 Number 1

 

Contents

 

   Skyview and Risk Mgt

 

   Online Forecasts
 

   Drought Monitor

 

   December

    Summary

 

   December Stats

 

   January Preview

 

   Sunrise/Sunset

 

   Snow Totals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 2005

 

Avg High 43.1

Avg Low 17.2

Snow - 4.1"

Season Snow - 10.6"

Precipitation - 0.35"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January

Avg High 43.2

Avg Low 15.2

Avg Snow -  7.7"

Avg Precip - 0.51"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skyview Weather 

2350 N Rocky View Rd

Castle Rock, CO 80108

 

Phone: (303) 688-9175

Fax: (303) 660-0548

 

E-mail:    

tim@skyview-wx.com

 

Were on the Web!

http://www.skyview-wx.com/

 

Copyright 2006

Skyview Weather

Risk Management and Skyview Weather 

Risk management is defined as an activity that evaluates risks, and developments and implements  procedures that reduce or eliminate the exposure to harm and loss.   Or, put another way, it is the process of evaluating what can go wrong, and taking steps to prevent it. Predictable is preventable.

As an example of risk management, lets begin with the following chart:.

The 10 most dangerous jobs
Occupation Fatalities per 100,000  
Timber cutters 117.8  
Fishermen 71.1  
Pilots and navigators 69.8  
Structural metal workers 58.2  
Drivers-sales workers 37.9  
Roofers 37  
Electrical power installers 32.5  
Farm occupations 28  
Construction laborers 27.7  
Truck drivers 25  

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics; survey of occupations with minimum 30 fatalities and 45,000 workers in 2002.

Its not a surprise that timber cutters and fisherman top the list, but note the 10th item on the list, truck drivers.  Truck driving is a dangerous occupation, with 25 fatalities per 100,000 workers, and one of the occupations with the highest in numbers killed, with almost 600 drivers killed each year (in recent years).   Yet, when was the last time you heard of UPS having a driver killed.  No driver fatalities occurred in 2004.  Or 2003. Or 2002. Or 2001.  Lucky?  Hardly.  UPS has one of the most extensive risk management programs in America today, training drivers on everything from which foot to step down on, how to load a package, how to safely drive.  Clearly, risk management at UPS has been highly successful.  Risk management works!
 

An effective risk management plan requires several key items:

                                   Risk Identification and Evaluation

                                                        ||

                                      Risk Control and Education

                                                        ||

                                      Risk Monitoring and Reaction

The first step in any risk management plan is access the risks that apply in your organization.  Identifying hazards, and a review of the consequences and severity of the consequences if the event should take place must be reviewed. Only by having an understanding of the specific risks that your organization faces can steps be taken to reduce or eliminate those hazards.

Once risks have been identified, steps to reduce or eliminate the risk should be implemented.  Procedures and policies are reviewed and set up.  Once procedures are in place, education becomes critical.  The best procedures cannot be followed if no one knows of the procedures, and the proper steps to be taken once an event is occurring.  Education is even more critical with time sensitive events, when reaction time is of the essence.  Remember, identifiable risks are manageable risks!

The third step is risk monitoring.  Only by being aware of specific risks to your organization, and monitoring for that risk, can an organization properly react when the risk develops.

Many risks can be identified at a given location, from hazardous chemicals, to proper ladder placement, to fire mitigation issues.  Another hazard, both economically and physical, is weather hazards. With regard to weather hazards, Skyview Weather is in the risk management business, particularly with risk monitoring.  As you know, Skyview Weather monitors a variety of weather conditions, and updates clients with specific information regarding weather threats that are in or near their location. 

However, risk monitoring is just one part of an organizations risk management activities.  It has become apparent to us that organizations need to look at risk identification as well as risk control and education needs.  Skyview Weather can assist with both of these areas, working with our clients to identify weather risks to there facilities.  Although risk assessment is an ongoing process, it is particularly important to do an assessment prior to the higher risk seasons, for summer clients, winter is an excellent time to do an assessment.

Beyond risk assessments, Skyview Weather sees a critical need for risk control measures, and in particular, education.  Employees of an organization need to have regular training as to how to utilize information received by Skyview Weather with regard to risk monitoring.  Plans of action need to be understood, and designed, prior to an event.  In response to this critical need, Skyview Weather is in the process of designing a number of educational classes for both clients, and non clients alike.  More information on these classes will be coming soon.

Risk management activities are an ongoing process, and result in financial savings through mitigation of hazards, proper response to hazards, and a safer environment.  Although Skyview Weather cannot eliminate all risks associated with weather, through proper implementation of a risk management plan focusing on assessment, education, and operational monitoring, Skyview Weather can certainly assist your organization in reducing weather related risks.

                                   

Online Forecasts Available

Skyview Weather is happy to announce that online forecasts and snow reports are again available on our sister www.anythingweather.com website.  Forecasts and snow reports are password protected, but an email to Tim@Skyview-WX.com requesting your forecast and/or snow reports be available online will result in an account being setup for you.  As always, forecasts and snow reports are for client use only, but with the online access, forecasts and snow reports are just a click away from any computer with an internet connection!

Drought Update

Little change in drought conditions across most of Colorado, with few areas of drought remaining..

The map below shows forecasted temperature deviances for December 2005. As can be seen, above normal  temperatures are expected for Colorado for December 2005.

The map below shows forecasted precipitation deviances for December 2005.  Normal or near normal precipitation is expected for Colorado for December 2005.

As can be seen in the below map, most of the state has come out of the widespread drought conditions of a year ago, with drought not expected to redevelopment in the near term..

December Summary

Even though we finished the month with near normal temperatures, the month as a whole was on the mild side.  We did have one week when cold arctic air sat over the state and that brought the averages to the near normal mark.  The other 3 weeks featured temperatures in the 50s and 60s well above normal.  Temperatures did range from 69 on Christmas Day, a new record, to a -13 on the 7th which was the start of the cold arctic air.

Moisture wise it was a dry month for everyone along the Front Range.  We did see a couple of light snowfalls during the month with the official total at Stapleton of only 1.7 inches.  Snowfall was rather spotty in eastern Colorado for the month, but the heaviest snows were in central sections of Douglas County where Monument Hill reported just over 15 inches of snow.  The rest of the Denver metro area came in around 2-6 inches for the month.  Liquid moisture came in at only 0.35 inches which was 0.28 inches below the normal for the month as a whole. 

With December coming in below normal for precipitation the calendar year was also below normal.  The good news out of all this is that we have seen a constant parade of pacific storm systems that have been bringing record snowfalls to the Colorado high country and this is where the Front Range gets most of its water.

December Stats

TEMPERATURE (IN DEGREES F)

 

 

 

 

 

 

AVERAGE MAX

43.1

NORMAL

44.1

DEPARTURE

-1.0

AVERAGE MIN

17.2

NORMAL

16.4

DEPARTURE

+0.8

MONTHLY MEAN

30.1

NORMAL

30.3

DEPARTURE

-0.2

HIGHEST

69 on the 25th

LOWEST

-13 on the 7th

 

 

 

 

 

 

DAYS WITH MAX 90 OR ABOVE

0

NORMAL

0

DAYS WITH MAX 32 OR BELOW

8

NORMAL

5

DAYS WITH MIN 32 OR BELOW

24

NORMAL

29

DAYS WITH MIN ZERO OR BELOW

3

NORMAL

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

TEMPERATURE RECORDS

 

Record High of 69 on Dec 25th  Record Low of -13 on Dec 7
Record High of 66 on Dec 31st  Record Low Max Temp of 3 on Dec 7

 

 

 

 

 

 

HEATING DEGREE DAYS

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONTHLY TOTAL

1075

NORMAL

1078

DEPARTURE

-3

SEASONAL TOTAL

2236

NORMAL

2486

DEPARTURE

-250

 

 

 

 

 

 

COOLING DEGREE DAYS

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONTHLY TOTAL

0

NORMAL

0

DEPARTURE

0

YEARLY TOTAL

927

NORMAL

696

DEPARTURE

+231

 

 

 

 

 

 

PRECIPITATION (IN INCHES)

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONTHLY TOTAL

0.35

NORMAL

0.63

DEPARTURE

-0.28

YEARLY TOTAL

12.80

NORMAL

15.81

DEPARTURE

-3.01

GREATEST IN 24 HOURS

0.21 on the 2nd-3rd

DAYS WITH MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION

6

 

 

 

 

SNOWFALL (IN INCHES)

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONTHLY TOTAL

4.1

NORMAL

8.7

DEPARTURE

-4.6

SEASONAL TOTAL

14.7

NORMAL

25.6

DEPARTURE

-10.9

GREATEST IN 24 HOURS

2.6

GREATEST DEPTH

3" on 2nd/3rd

 

 

 

 

 

 

WIND (IN MILES PER HOUR)

 

 

 

 

 

 

AVERAGE SPEED

10.0

       

PEAK WIND GUST

64mph from West  on the 29th

 

 

 

 

 

 

MISCELLANEOUS WEATHER

 

 

 

 

 

 

NUMBER OF DAYS WITH THUNDERSTORMS

0

NORMAL

 0

NUMBER OF DAYS WITH HEAVY FOG

1

NORMAL

 1

NUMBER OF DAYS WITH HAIL

0

 

 

PERCENT OF SUNSHINE

75

 

 

 

 

 

January Preview

January is the coldest month of the year in Denver.  The record low temperature for each day of the month is at least 10 degrees below zero.  In addition, it is not uncommon for the mercury to drop below the freezing mark every night of the month.  The coldest temperature ever recorded in Denver was 29 degrees below zero recorded on January 9th 1875.

Even though January is the coldest month of the year there is usually not an abundance of inclement weather.  It is the second driest month of the year in terms of total precipitation and only the 5th snowiest month.  An exception to this was in 1992 when 24.3 inches of snow fell during the month, making it the snowiest January in Denver history.

The weather during January is quite changeable which, to be honest, is a characteristic of just about any month in Denver.  Cold blasts of arctic air usually bring several light snows and sub-zero temperatures to the area.  On the other hand, Chinook winds that warm temperatures into the 50s and 60s are also common.  These winds may blow as high as 100 miles per hour in and near the foothills.  Chinooks are far more common than blizzards during January.

DENVER'S JANUARY CLIMATOLOGICALLY NORMAL

(NORMAL PERIOD 1971-2000)

 

 

TEMPERATURE

 

 

 

AVERAGE HIGH

43.2

AVERAGE LOW

15.2

MONTHLY MEAN

29/2

DAYS WITH HIGH 90 OR ABOVE

0

DAYS WITH HIGH 32 OR BELOW

7

DAYS WITH LOW 32 OR BELOW

30

DAYS WITH LOWS ZERO OR BELOW

4

 

 

PRECIPITATION

 

 

 

MONTHLY MEAN

0.51"

DAYS WITH MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION

6

AVERAGE SNOWFALL IN INCHES

7.7"

DAYS WITH 1.0 INCH OF SNOW OR MORE

2

 

 

MISCELLANEOUS AVERAGES

 

 

 

HEATING DEGREE DAYS

1111

COOLING DEGREE DAYS

0

WIND SPEED (MPH)

8.6

WIND DIRECTION

SOUTH

DAYS WITH THUNDERSTORMS

0

DAYS WITH DENSE FOG

1

PERCENT OF SUNSHINE POSSIBLE

71

 

 

JANUARY EXTREMES

 

 

 

RECORD HIGH

76 DEGREES ON 1/27/1888

RECORD LOW

-29 DEGREES ON 1/9/1875

WARMEST

40.3 DEGREES IN 1986

COLDEST

16.9 DEGREES IN 1930

WETTEST

2.35 INCHES IN 1883

DRIEST

0.01 IN 1933, 1934, 1952

SNOWIEST

24.3 IN 1992

LEAST SNOWIEST

TR IN 1934 & 2003

Sunrise/Sunset (Denver area)

     Date

Sunrise

Sunset

     January  1  

07:21

16:46

     January  5

07:21

16:49

     January 10

07:20

16:54

     January 15

07:19

16:59

     January 20

07:16

17:04

     January 25

07:13

17:10

     January 30

07:09

17:16

 Snowfall

October 2005 to April 2006

City

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan Feb Mar Apr

Seasonal Totals

Aurora (Central)

12.0 1.0 7.0         20.0

Castle Rock 4 NE

12.5 3.1 5.4         20.1

Colorado Springs

 TR TR 9.7         9.7
Denver Stapleton 9.6 0.9 4.1         14.6

Denver Downtown

3.5 0.2 5.3         9.0

Golden

0.9 3.5 8.3         12.7

Highlands Ranch

7.5 3.5 8.2         19.2

Lakewood

2.0 2.5 6.0         10.5

Littleton

2.0 3.5 6.5         12.0

Louisville

0.0 TR 6.5         6.5

Parker

11.0 3.5 6.1         20.6

Sedalia

13.0 6.0 9.7         28.7

Thornton

0.0 .5 7.5         8.0

Westminster

1.0 0.7 3.2         4.9

Wheatridge

3.6 1.9 5.5         11.0