The Weather Wire

 

February 2006                                                                                                            Volume 14 Number 2

 

Contents

 

·   Wet Start to Winter but

 

·   Safety Classes Offered
 
·   Online Forecasts
 

·   Drought Monitor

 

·   January

    Summary

 

·   January Stats

 

·   February Preview

 

·   Sunrise/Sunset

 

·   Snow Totals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 2006

 

Avg High 51.6

Avg Low 23.2

Snow - 3.3"

Season Snow - 18.0"

Precipitation - 0.28"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

February

Avg High 47.2

Avg Low 19.1

Avg Snow -  6.3"

Avg Precip - 0.49"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skyview Weather 

2350 N Rocky View Rd

Castle Rock, CO 80108

 

Phone: (303) 688-9175

Fax: (303) 660-0548

 

E-mail:    

tim@skyview-wx.com

 

We’re on the Web!

http://www.skyview-wx.com/

 

Copyright 2006

Skyview Weather

A Wet Start to Winter but... 

After a rather wet start to our winter season things have dried out considerably for December and January.  These two months featured plenty of windy dry and mild days.  The overall pattern for these two month’s, basically remained unchanged with Pacific storms hitting the Northwest hard with heavy rains and heavy snow.  Our high country has also benefited from these storms and the northern and central mountains are having a near record year for snowfall.  This is good news for the Front Range since most of the water used along the Front Range comes from the winter snowmelt.

Data collected at the Downtown City Office from 1872-December 1949, then at the Stapleton Airport Office from January 1950-February 1995, then at Denver International Airport from March 1995-Present.

The winter season started strong with an early branch breaking snowstorm.  This first snow was a little odd in that areas or west Denver received more rain than snow and snow totals were not as impressive as DIA who reported 9.6”.  Areas of Aurora saw accumulations of 12” or more.  As a whole the metro area saw between 2 and 3 inches of liquid equivalent.  Were it not for this first early storm we would be far below average for the winter season, as we have had below average precipitation since.  November was much warmer than average and is usually one of our snowiest months.  This year we were roughly 50% of average for November in the precipitation department, but only received 10% of our monthly average snowfall.  Dry weather continued through December where 0.35” of liquid were observed compared to 0.63” which is average.  Only 4.1 inches of snow reported versus 8.7 inches being the average for December.  January has also been very warm and relatively dry as well, for the month 0.28” of precipitation has been reported and 3.6” of snow compared with 0.51” and 7.7” being average.  Much warmer temperatures than average, and plenty of windy days has helped evaporate available surface moisture which can only compound the problem with the lack of significant precipitation we have had recently. 

Totals for the winter season (Oct. 1st - Jan 31st) are as follows:

 

Precip.

Snowfall

Avg. Precip.

Avg. Snowfall

October

2.16

9.6

0.99

4.1

November

0.48

1.0

0.98

10.7

December

0.35

4.1

0.63

8.7

January

0.28

3.3

0.51

7.7

Totals:

3.27

18.3

3.11

31.2

 

 

 

 

 

Deviation

+0.16

-12.9

 

 

 

 

 

Precip.

Snowfall

Avg. Precip.

Avg. Snowfall

November

0.48

1.0

0.98

10.7

December

0.35

4.1

0.63

8.7

January

0.28

3.3

0.51

7.7

Totals:

1.11

8.4

2.12

27.1

 

 

 

 

 

Deviation

-1.01

-18.4

 

 

As you can see we are above average in precipitation for the winter season, but that is a little misleading.  Much of the precipitation fell in one storm and we have been relatively warm and dry since.  Even with the first big snow we are well below average for snowfall and this number is also misleading because many areas of town did not receive as much precipitation in the form of snow as DIA.  The upside is that two of our snowiest months are on the way.  March and April are notorious for big snows and this year we will certainly need these months to prove productive for precipitation, or that drought word will be floating around again.

We will need to keep our fingers crossed on this.  For now the latest 10 and 30 days outlooks that cover the month of February continue a mild and dry pattern for eastern Colorado.

Skyview Offers Safety Classes

As we discussed in last months newsletter, risk management is a critical component of each organization.  One component is education, and Skyview Weather is proud to announce educational classes intended to promote weather awareness and increased safety.  At this time, the following classes are available.

Basic Weather Safety - This 1 hour safety oriented class reviews basic weather safety, including flash flood safety, lightning safety, and tornado safety as well as reviewing NWS products, with specific emphasis on watches and warnings.

Basic Weather Safety and Severe Weather Spotting - This 3 hour class begins with basic weather safety, including flash flood safety, lightning safety, and tornado safety as well as reviewing NWS products, with specific emphasis on watches and warnings. Basic weather concepts  and basic weather spotting is included, with emphasis on thunderstorm features.

Basic Weather Safety for Coaches - This 60-90 minute safety oriented class is similar to Basic Weather Safety, but designed for coaches and other administrators that must determine whether to suspend or cancel outdoor sports events.  Heavy emphasis on lightning safety, as well as severe thunderstorm safety is presented. A review of NWS publicly disseminated products, including watches and warnings, is included. Basic weather safety, including flash flood safety, lightning safety, and tornado safety is discussed.

Extended Weather Safety and Spotting - As with the above classes, this all day class begins with basic weather safety, including flash flood safety, lightning safety, and tornado safety as well as reviewing NWS products, with specific emphasis on watches and warnings.  Basic weather concepts and definitions are discussed, with extensive time on the role of spotters, and key spotting features of developing severe storms. Video presentations are included as well.

Radar 101 - Everyone utilizes radar on the internet, but just what exactly are you looking at?  This 2 hour class answers that question, providing an introduction to radar,  a review of publicly available radar products on the internet, and how to interpret what the radar.  This class is critical for those organizations attempting to use publicly available internet weather for client and employee safety.

Getting the most from Skyview Weather ... Client-Skyview interaction - This 2 hour class focuses on how existing clients of Skyview Weather can get the most from Skyview Weathers extensive services.  A review of what Skyview offers, product delivery, and Skyview Weather terms is presented.

All classes are presented using PowerPoint, and include handouts.  Questions are always welcome, and encourage..  Selected classes include video as well.  Please contact Skyview Weather for scheduling and pricing information.  As always, you can reach us at 303-688-9175 or via email at tim@skyview-wx.com .

Online Forecasts Available

Skyview Weather is happy to announce that online forecasts and snow reports are again available on our sister www.anythingweather.com website.  Forecasts and snow reports are password protected, but an email to Tim@Skyview-WX.com requesting your forecast and/or snow reports be available online will result in an account being setup for you.  As always, forecasts and snow reports are for client use only, but with the online access, forecasts and snow reports are just a click away from any computer with an internet connection!

Drought Update

Some increase in drought conditions across Colorado was noted during January 2006, primarily over Eastern portions of the state.

The map below shows forecasted temperature deviances for February 2006. As can be seen, below normal temperatures are expected for northwestern Colorado, with the remainder of the state seeing normal  temperatures for February 2006.

The map below shows forecasted precipitation deviances for February 2006.  Normal or near normal precipitation is expected for Colorado for February 2006.

As can be seen in the below map, most of the state has come out of the widespread drought conditions of a year ago, though some areas of drought are developing across southern and southeastern portions of the state.

January Summary

The average temperature for January 2006 was 8.2 degrees above normal, but only finished as the 8th warmest Denver January in Denver weather history.  The warmest January occurred in 1986 with a 40.3 average for the month.  Temperatures during the month ranged from a record tying 69 degrees on the 7th tying the record last set in 1969.  The monthly low was 9 degrees on the 16th.  Only one other tied record for the month, 66 degrees on the 6th tying the record set in 1903.

28 days had either partly cloudy or fair weather conditions which accounted for the only 3 days of measurable precipitation.  The total for the month was 0.28 inches which was 0.23 inch below normal.  Stapleton recorded 2 days with snow with a total of 3.3 inches which was 4.4 below normal. 

Overall another mild and dry month for Denver.

January Stats

TEMPERATURE (IN DEGREES F)

 

 

 

 

 

 

AVERAGE MAX

51.6

NORMAL

43.2

DEPARTURE

8.4

AVERAGE MIN

23.2

NORMAL

15.2

DEPARTURE

8.0

MONTHLY MEAN

37.4

NORMAL

29.2

DEPARTURE

8.2

HIGHEST

69 on the 7th

LOWEST

9 on the 16th

 

 

 

 

 

 

DAYS WITH MAX 90 OR ABOVE

0

NORMAL

0

DAYS WITH MAX 32 OR BELOW

0

NORMAL

7

DAYS WITH MIN 32 OR BELOW

26

NORMAL

30

DAYS WITH MIN ZERO OR BELOW

0

NORMAL

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

TEMPERATURE RECORDS

 

Tied Record High of 69 on Jan 7th  
   

 

 

 

 

 

 

HEATING DEGREE DAYS

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONTHLY TOTAL

848

NORMAL

1111

DEPARTURE

-263

SEASONAL TOTAL

3084

NORMAL

3597

DEPARTURE

-513

 

 

 

 

 

 

COOLING DEGREE DAYS

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONTHLY TOTAL

0

NORMAL

0

DEPARTURE

0

YEARLY TOTAL

0

NORMAL

0

DEPARTURE

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

PRECIPITATION (IN INCHES)

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONTHLY TOTAL

0.28

NORMAL

0.51

DEPARTURE

-0.23

YEARLY TOTAL

0.28

NORMAL

0.51

DEPARTURE

-0.34

GREATEST IN 24 HOURS

0.27 on the 19th-20th

DAYS WITH MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION

3

 

 

 

 

SNOWFALL (IN INCHES)

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONTHLY TOTAL

3.3

NORMAL

7.7

DEPARTURE

-4.4

SEASONAL TOTAL

18.0

NORMAL

33.3

DEPARTURE

-15.3

GREATEST IN 24 HOURS

3

GREATEST DEPTH

3" on 19th/20

 

 

 

 

 

 

WIND (IN MILES PER HOUR)

 

 

 

 

 

 

AVERAGE SPEED

11.3

       

PEAK WIND GUST

44mph from West on the 3rd

 

 

 

 

 

 

MISCELLANEOUS WEATHER

 

 

 

 

 

 

NUMBER OF DAYS WITH THUNDERSTORMS

0

NORMAL

 0

NUMBER OF DAYS WITH HEAVY FOG

2

NORMAL

 1

NUMBER OF DAYS WITH HAIL

0

 

 

PERCENT OF SUNSHINE

87

 

 

 

 

 

February Preview

February has a reputation as a rather grim month in many parts of the country.  However, that is not usually the case in Denver.  Even though it may not be grim, it is still winter with below freezing temperatures occurring almost every night and on average, 6.3 inches of snow is recorded during the month.  February is Denver’s 6th snowiest month.  February stands out as having relatively uneventful weather and joins September and October for the quiet months of the year.  February is a transitional month between occasional severe cold of mid-winter and the spring storms that are common along the Front Range. 

The mild weather in February often gives Denver residents a false sense of spring.  About the time we get in that spring mood the big snowstorms of March and April arrive with more winter like weather.  Just a few years back the St. Patrick’s Day blizzard lasted for 3 days and dropped 2-4 feet of heavy wet snow along the Front Range. 

DENVER'S FEBRUARY CLIMATOLOGICALLY NORMAL

(NORMAL PERIOD 1971-2000)

 

 

TEMPERATURE

 

 

 

AVERAGE HIGH

47.2

AVERAGE LOW

19.1

MONTHLY MEAN

33.2

DAYS WITH HIGH 90 OR ABOVE

0

DAYS WITH HIGH 32 OR BELOW

4

DAYS WITH LOW 32 OR BELOW

26

DAYS WITH LOWS ZERO OR BELOW

2

 

 

PRECIPITATION

 

 

 

MONTHLY MEAN

0.49"

DAYS WITH MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION

6

AVERAGE SNOWFALL IN INCHES

6.3"

DAYS WITH 1.0 INCH OF SNOW OR MORE

2

 

 

MISCELLANEOUS AVERAGES

 

 

 

HEATING DEGREE DAYS

892

COOLING DEGREE DAYS

0

WIND SPEED (MPH)

8.8

WIND DIRECTION

SOUTH

DAYS WITH THUNDERSTORMS

0

DAYS WITH DENSE FOG

1

PERCENT OF SUNSHINE POSSIBLE

70

 

 

FEBRUARY EXTREMES

 

 

 

RECORD HIGH

77 DEGREES ON 2/4/1890

RECORD LOW

-25 DEGREES ON 2/1/1951

WARMEST

43.7 DEGREES IN 1954

COLDEST

17.6 DEGREES IN 1899

WETTEST

2.01 INCHES IN 1934

DRIEST

0.01 IN 1970

SNOWIEST

22.1IN 1912

LEAST SNOWIEST

0.3 IN 1970

Sunrise/Sunset (Denver area)

     Date

Sunrise

Sunset

     February  1  

07:08

17:18

     February  5

07:04

17:23

     February 10

06:59

17:29

     February 15

06:53

17:35

     February 20

06:46

17:40

     February 25

06:39

17:46

     February 28

06:05

17:49

 Snowfall

October 2005 to April 2006

City

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan Feb Mar Apr

Seasonal Totals

Aurora (Central)

9.9 1.0 7.0 2.5       20.4

Castle Rock 4 NE

12.5 3.1 5.4 5.0       25.3

Colorado Springs

 TR TR 9.7 2.8       12.5
Denver Stapleton 9.6 0.9 4.1 3.6       18.2

Denver Downtown

3.5 0.2 5.3 4.3       13.3

Golden

0.9 3.5 8.3 6.0       18.7

Highlands Ranch

7.5 3.5 8.2 6.0       25.2

Lakewood

2.0 2.5 6.0 5.2       10.5

Littleton

2.0 3.5 6.5 7.3       19.3

Louisville

0.0 TR 6.5 2.5       9.0

Parker

11.0 3.5 6.1 1.2       21.8

Sedalia

13.0 6.0 9.7 9.5       38.2

Thornton

0.0 .5 7.5 2.5       10.5

Westminster

1.0 0.7 3.2 2.7       7.6

Wheatridge

3.6 1.9 5.5 5.8       16.8