The Weather Wire

 

December 2006                                                                                                            Volume 14 Number 12

 

Contents

 

·   Skyview Products

 

·   Drought Monitor

 

·   November

    Summary

 

·   November Stats

 

·   December Preview

 

·   Sunrise/Sunset

 

·   Snow Totals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November 2006

 

Avg High 54.8

Avg Low 26.1

Snow - 4.4"

Season Snow - 14.2"

Precipitation - 0.34"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December

Avg High 44.1

Avg Low 16.4

Avg Snow -  8.7"

Avg Precip - 0.63"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skyview Weather 

2350 Rocky View Rd

Castle Rock, CO 80108

 

Phone: (303) 688-9175

Fax: (303) 660-0548

 

E-mail:    

tim@skyview-wx.com

 

We’re on the Web!

http://www.skyview-wx.com/

 

Copyright 2006

Skyview Weather

Skyview Products and Procedures...

From time to time, our discussions with clients reveal that the full extent of the product offerings of Skyview Weather are not always known, so we thought we would review our typical winter products.

Forecasts are issued each day (with the exception of Sunday, where issue if adverse weather is expected but typically not if conditions are anticipated to be dry) between 6-830am in the morning.  Our forecast product is designed to provide updates on daily highs, lows, significant winds, daily max and min rh values, and expected precipitation.  Any significant NWS watches and/or warnings are included in the morning forecast (if any are in effect).   

On our forecast page we have 3 separate areas.  We list two cities usually revenant to your area with high, low and precipitation either rain or snow.  The high is yesterdays’ high temperature for that city and overnight low temperature. Precipitation is calendar day midnight to midnight.

The body of text that follows explains the current forecast situation along with any storm watches or warnings.  It will also break out different areas that the forecaster feels are of concern and puts the expected weather conditions for the next 2-3 days in an easy to understand narrative.  Below the forecast narrative you find minimum and maximum expected relative humidity for the current day overnight and for the next day along with the current days sunset time.

The five day forecast box follows.  This includes today’s forecast, the overnight forecast and the expected weather for the following 4 days.  The days forecast covers through 6pm, with the overnight forecast covering 6pm-6am.  Occasionally, there is some confusion on the cutoff times so we did want to clarify this point.

Forecasts are primarily distributed via e-mail, though Skyview Weather also distributes forecasts via fax, alphanumeric pager/pda, and posts forecasts to a password protected section of our web page.  If you desire web page access, Skyview Weather can set up an account for you.  It is important that Skyview Weather be made aware of any e-mail changes, or fax number changes.  Also, if you do not receive a forecast by mid morning, please advise so that we can resend the forecast to you.   

Forecasts are reviewed during the mid afternoon hours, and when adverse weather is approaching, if a forecast update is needed, it typically is issued between 330-430pm.  However, if conditions deviate from the forecast, or forecasts become unrepresentative of actual conditions, an update may be issued at any time.

Operational updates are made through the day as needed verbally, though during the winter season we typically update our snow clients in the early evening if snow is anticipated overnight.  It should also be noted that if the weather is following the morning forecast closely, then updates will be fewer, and afternoon written updates typically do not occur.

In addition to the forecast products and operational updates, Skyview Weather issues storm reports following winter storms, providing a summary of the storm and a table of actual snowfall amounts.  This product is delivered via e-mail, fax, and is also on our website.  These storm reports are usually completed within 2 business days following the storm.

As technology has changed, e-mail has become the primary means of distributing forecast information, and brief updates, owing to the rapid dissemination that is achieved via e-mail. We recommend e-mail to our clients to receive forecast information, though Skyview Weather does fax and will accommodate fax requests. 

Regarding phone calls, please call the primary office number at 303-688-9175 for verbal updates.  If we do not answer, please leave a message and we will be paged.  Calling our cell phones is ok, but please understand that a message left on a cell phone will not page us, and may not be retrieved in a timely manner.  If you e-mail an operational weather request, please include each of us on the email (tim@skyview-wx.com, paul@skyview-wx.com, and brad@skyview-wx.com ) as we do not check each others email, and an email to one of us may be missed.

Drought Update

Little change in overall drought conditions across Colorado occurred in November.

The map below shows forecasted temperature deviances for December 2006. As can be seen,  normal temperatures are expected for Colorado for December 2006.

The map below shows forecasted precipitation deviances for December2006.  Normal precipitation is expected for all of Colorado for December 2006.

As can be seen in the below map, drought improvement is forecast for portions of  Colorado through February.

November Summary

On November 8th, the temperature at DIA reached 80 degrees.  This is the highest ever temperature recorded during November since weather records began in 1872.  The previous record, tied four times was 79 degrees.  The first 3 weeks of the month was quiet with mostly mild and dry conditions.  November was headed towards one of the top 10 warmest, when the last week of the month the pattern changed.  During that last week we saw one day with a high of only 20 degrees and two lows of 5 and 0 degrees respectively ending any chance of getting into the top 10 warmest.

Precipitation for November 2006 totaled 0.34 inch.  Again another month below normal.  Had it not been for the snow on the 29th November would have been the 8th driest month on record. 4.4 inches of snow was recorded on the 29th and 30th  and this wound up being the total snow for the month, which was 6.3 inches below the normal of 10.7 inches.  Total precipitation through November is 7.43 inches.  This is the same amount of moisture that was recorded for the driest year ever in Denver, 2005.  With the snows continuing into the first week of December we are no longer looking at another record dry year.

November Stats

TEMPERATURE (IN DEGREES F)

 

 

 

 

 

 

AVERAGE MAX

54.8

NORMAL

51.5

DEPARTURE

3.3

AVERAGE MIN

26.1

NORMAL

23.5

DEPARTURE

2.6

MONTHLY MEAN

40.5

NORMAL

37.5

DEPARTURE

3.0

HIGHEST

80 on the 8th

0

22 on the 30th

 

 

 

 

 

 

DAYS WITH MAX 90 OR ABOVE

0

NORMAL

0

DAYS WITH MAX 32 OR BELOW

1

NORMAL

3

DAYS WITH MIN 32 OR BELOW

23

NORMAL

24

DAYS WITH MIN ZERO OR BELOW

1

NORMAL

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

TEMPERATURE RECORDS

 
 Record High of 80 on 11-8-2006  

 

 

 

 

 

 

HEATING DEGREE DAYS

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONTHLY TOTAL

727

NORMAL

826

DEPARTURE

-99

SEASONAL TOTAL

1424

NORMAL

1408

DEPARTURE

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

COOLING DEGREE DAYS

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONTHLY TOTAL

0

NORMAL

0

DEPARTURE

0

YEARLY TOTAL

961

NORMAL

696

DEPARTURE

265

 

 

 

 

 

 

PRECIPITATION (IN INCHES)

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONTHLY TOTAL

0.34

NORMAL

0.98"

DEPARTURE

-0.64

YEARLY TOTAL

7.43

NORMAL

15.15"

DEPARTURE

-7.72

GREATEST IN 24 HOURS

0.21"

DAYS WITH MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION

3

 

 

 

 

SNOWFALL (IN INCHES)

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONTHLY TOTAL

4.4

NORMAL

10.7

DEPARTURE

-6.3

SEASONAL TOTAL

14.2

NORMAL

16.9

DEPARTURE

-2.7

GREATEST IN 24 HOURS

4.2"

GREATEST DEPTH

4"

 

 

 

 

 

 

WIND (IN MILES PER HOUR)

 

 

 

 

 

 

AVERAGE SPEED

9.6

       

PEAK WIND GUST

52mph from the N

 

 

 

 

 

 

MISCELLANEOUS WEATHER

 

 

 

 

 

 

NUMBER OF DAYS WITH THUNDERSTORMS

0

 NORMAL

 0

NUMBER OF DAYS WITH HEAVY FOG

3

 NORMAL

 1

NUMBER OF DAYS WITH HAIL

0

 

 

PERCENT OF SUNSHINE

80

NORMAL

64

 

 

 

December Preview

Although winter does not officially arrive until December 21st, under normal conditions, by December 21st, Denver has usually experienced a taste of winter.

Normally prolonged cold spells are more frequent in January however, 2 of Denver’s longest cold spells occurred during December.  In 1983, the temperature dropped below zero on the 20th and did not return above zero until Christmas day, a record 115 hours.  The temperature was below zero for 85.5 hours during December 1990 and during that period, the mercury dropped to 25 degrees below zero on the 22nd, tying the record for the lowest ever Denver December temperature.

Even though December ranks as Denver’s 6th snowiest month, some of Denver’s biggest and most memorable snowstorms occurred in December.  The Christmas blizzard in 1982 rates as one of the most vicious snowstorms in Denver’s history.  Snow began on the 24th and by midday on Christmas day, in a period of 24 hours, 23.6 inches of snow fell at Stapleton airport.  The most snow from one storm (45.7 inches) occurred   in 1913 when snow fell for the first six days of the month.  Just over 37 inches of that total fell on the 4th and 5th.

December can have several occurrences of Chinook winds, mostly near the foothills.  These winds rarely cause problems in Denver, however, in the foothills cities like Boulder and Fort Collins, wind speeds during a Chinook event can exceed 100 miles per hour.  In December of 1990, a wind gust of 120 mph was recorded in south Boulder, just to the northwest of Metro Denver.

DENVER'S DECEMBER CLIMATOLOGICALLY NORMAL

(NORMAL PERIOD 1971-2000)

 

 

TEMPERATURE

 

 

 

AVERAGE HIGH

44.1

AVERAGE LOW

16.4

MONTHLY MEAN

30.3

DAYS WITH HIGH 90 OR ABOVE

0

DAYS WITH HIGH 32 OR BELOW

5

DAYS WITH LOW 32 OR BELOW

29

DAYS WITH LOWS ZERO OR BELOW

3

 

 

PRECIPITATION

 

 

 

MONTHLY MEAN

0.63"

DAYS WITH MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION

5

AVERAGE SNOWFALL IN INCHES

8.7"

DAYS WITH 1.0 INCH OF SNOW OR MORE

3

 

 

MISCELLANEOUS AVERAGES

 

 

 

HEATING DEGREE DAYS

1078

COOLING DEGREE DAYS

0

WIND SPEED (MPH)

8.4

WIND DIRECTION

SOUTH

DAYS WITH THUNDERSTORMS

0

DAYS WITH DENSE FOG

1

PERCENT OF SUNSHINE POSSIBLE

67

 

 

EXTREMES

 

 

 

RECORD HIGH

79 DEGREES ON 12/05/1939

RECORD LOW

-25 DEGREES ON 12/22/1990

WARMEST

43.8 DEGREES IN 1933

COLDEST

17.5 DEGREES IN 1983

WETTEST

5.21INCHES IN 1913

DRIEST

0.00 IN 1881

SNOWIEST

57.4" INCHES in 1913

LEAST SNOWIEST

0.0 1881

Sunrise/Sunset (Denver area)

     Date

Sunrise

Sunset

     Dec 1  

07:01

16:36

     Dec 5

07:05

16:35

     Dec 10

07:09

16:35

     Dec 15

07:13

16:35

     Dec 20

07:16

16:37

     Dec 25

07:19

16:40

     Dec 30

07:20

16:43

 Snowfall

October 2006 to April 2007

City

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan Feb Mar Apr

Seasonal Totals

Aurora (Central)

16.2 4.0           20.2

Castle Rock 4 NE

 22.5 6.0            28.5

Colorado Springs

6.1 3.5           9.6
Denver Stapleton  4.8 4.4            9.2

Denver Downtown

5.6 4.2           9.8

Golden

20.5 12.5           33.0

Highlands Ranch

19.0 5.0           24.0

Lakewood

13.3 5.0           18.3

Littleton

13.0 6.5           19.5

Louisville

 9.0 6.7            15.7

Parker

11.0 4.0           15.0

Sedalia - Hwy 67

13.0 4.5           17.5

Thornton

12.7 4.9           17.6

Westminster

13.9 5.3           19.2

Wheatridge

15.1 8.1           23.2