The Weather Wire

 

January 2007                                                                                                            Volume 15 Number 01

 

Contents

 

·   December Snows

 

·   Drought Monitor

 

·   December

    Summary

 

·   December Stats

 

·   January Preview

 

·   Sunrise/Sunset

 

·   Snow Totals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 2006

 

Avg High 42.0

Avg Low 21.4

Snow - 29.4"

Season Snow - 44.6"

Precipitation - 1.21"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January

Avg High 43.2

Avg Low 15.2

Avg Snow -  7.7"

Avg Precip - 0.51"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skyview Weather 

2350 Rocky View Rd

Castle Rock, CO 80108

 

Phone: (303) 688-9175

Fax: (303) 660-0548

 

E-mail:    

tim@skyview-wx.com

 

We’re on the Web!

http://www.skyview-wx.com/

 

Copyright 2006

Skyview Weather

December to Remember...

December 2006 will go down as the third snowiest December in Denver history with a total of 29.4”!  This ranks behind 1913 with 57.4” which is the most snow ever observed in one month and just behind 1973 with 30.8”.  December of 1982 will now be pushed down to the fourth snowiest December with 27.1”.  Nearly all of the snow came late in the month.  Up to the 19th of December there was only one minor storm for the month and a total of 0.5” observed at DIA.  In the following 10 days nearly two and a half feet of snow fell at the official reporting site with many areas receiving much more snow than that. 

Most of the snow came in two storm systems.  The first storm was the strongest with the most intense snowfall rates and highest winds creating blizzard conditions.  This storm dumped 20.7” at DIA and is responsible for nearly 70% of the total monthly accumulation.  This storm ranked 7th all time for largest snow storms in Denver history and is the second largest December snowstorm behind the Blizzard of 1982 when 23.8” fell. 

After a short break in the action a quick moving storm system brought some snow showers over Christmas with just minor accumulations.  Not much melting occurred since the first major storm and snow was still blanketing the ground as the second system began entering the state. 

It is not unusual to have back to back storms, but is a somewhat unusual to have back to back storms of this magnitude in December and the lack of melting between storms.  As is most often the case for lower elevations along the front range there is a melting period before the next system moves into the area.  In this case conditions were a little different.  The shortest day of the year is December 22nd and the suns angle is at its lowest point.  With the lack of direct sunlight snow becomes more difficult to melt and is partly responsible for the lack of melting between the two storms.  Another reason for melting between storm systems is that when a storm approaches south/southwesterly winds ahead of the system import warmer air form the south as flow around low pressure is counterclockwise.  These south/southwest winds are down slope from the mountains and the air is warmed via compression as the air moves off the mountains adding additional warming to the air and melting of the snow.  This did not happen with the incoming second system as snow on the ground kept a low level inversion present not allowing the warmer air to mix completely to the surface keeping a cool air mass in place over northeastern Colorado.  December is also a month where cold air usually dominates saving the big snow storms for fall and spring when there is a larger clash between warm and cold air masses making the big December snows quite rare.    

This second major storm system was touted by local media as, “Round Two”.  In reality this storm was a fraction of the intensity of the first storm and was never positioned in a prime location for back to back top ten storms for northeastern Colorado.  This storm ended up depositing snow amounts about half the total of the previous system in most areas.  Southeastern Colorado and northern New Mexico was favored for “Round Two” and record breaking snowfall amounts fell there.  DIA reported 8.0” with this system which is impressive, but nowhere near top ten status.

With the additional snow for the season DIA has reported 43.6”.  Normal snowfall up to the first of January is 25.6”, as of January 1st, Denver is 18.0” above average to this point and already 70% of the seasonal total of 61.7” which usually ends in May.  At this point it may be safe to say that this snow season will at least be average and more than likely well above average as historically some of the snowiest months are still to come!   

Drought Update

Little change, or perhaps improvement, in overall drought conditions across Colorado occurred in December.

The map below shows forecasted temperature deviances for January 2007. As can be seen,  above normal temperatures are expected for Colorado for January 2007.

The map below shows forecasted precipitation deviances for January 2007.  Normal precipitation is expected for Northern Colorado for January 2007, with above normal precipitation forecast for Southeast Colorado for January 2007..

As can be seen in the below map, drought improvement is forecast for portions of  Colorado through March.

December Summary

December 2006 finished the year with two major snowstorms that made this December the 3rd snowiest ever in Denver.  The two storm totaled 27.7 inches which when added to the other two days with measurable snow comes to a total of 29.4 inches.  The snowiest December ever was 57.4 inches recorded in 1913.  The maximum snow depth occurred on the 21st and the 22nd  with 21 inches.  The normal snowfall for December is 8.7 inches and the record 24 hour snowfall was 23.6 inches on December 24, 1982.  Precipitation was above normal for the month with a total of 1.21 inches.  This was 0.58 inches above the normal of 0.63 inches.  Two of the last 3 months have now been above normal.  Even so the year as a whole had only a total 8.64 inches which places 2006 as the 7th driest Denver year.

Temperatures for the month, even with all the snow, were above normal for the month as a whole.  The month finished with an average temperature of 31.7 degrees which was 1.4 degrees above normal.  No temperature records were tied or set.  The high for the month was 67 and the low was -1.

December Stats

TEMPERATURE (IN DEGREES F)

 

 

 

 

 

 

AVERAGE MAX

42.0

NORMAL

44.1

DEPARTURE

-2.1

AVERAGE MIN

21.4

NORMAL

16.4

DEPARTURE

5.0

MONTHLY MEAN

31.7

NORMAL

30.3

DEPARTURE

1.4

HIGHEST

67 on the 15th

LOWEST

-1 on the 3rd

 

 

 

 

 

 

DAYS WITH MAX 90 OR ABOVE

0

NORMAL

0

DAYS WITH MAX 32 OR BELOW

10

NORMAL

5

DAYS WITH MIN 32 OR BELOW

28

NORMAL

29

DAYS WITH MIN ZERO OR BELOW

1

NORMAL

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

TEMPERATURE RECORDS

 
 None  

 

 

 

 

 

 

HEATING DEGREE DAYS

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONTHLY TOTAL

1028

NORMAL

1078

DEPARTURE

-50

SEASONAL TOTAL

2452

NORMAL

2486

DEPARTURE

-34

 

 

 

 

 

 

COOLING DEGREE DAYS

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONTHLY TOTAL

0

NORMAL

0

DEPARTURE

0

YEARLY TOTAL

961

NORMAL

696

DEPARTURE

265

 

 

 

 

 

 

PRECIPITATION (IN INCHES)

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONTHLY TOTAL

1.21"

NORMAL

0.63"

DEPARTURE

0.58

YEARLY TOTAL

8.64"

NORMAL

16.13"

DEPARTURE

-7.49

GREATEST IN 24 HOURS

0.75"

DAYS WITH MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION

5

 

 

 

 

SNOWFALL (IN INCHES)

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONTHLY TOTAL

29.4

NORMAL

8.7

DEPARTURE

20.7

SEASONAL TOTAL

44.6

NORMAL

25.6

DEPARTURE

19.0

GREATEST IN 24 HOURS

NA

GREATEST DEPTH

21"

 

 

 

 

 

 

WIND (IN MILES PER HOUR)

 

 

 

 

 

 

AVERAGE SPEED

10.8

       

PEAK WIND GUST

55mph from the N

 

 

 

 

 

 

MISCELLANEOUS WEATHER

 

 

 

 

 

 

NUMBER OF DAYS WITH THUNDERSTORMS

0

 NORMAL

 0

NUMBER OF DAYS WITH HEAVY FOG

4

 NORMAL

 1

NUMBER OF DAYS WITH HAIL

0

 

 

PERCENT OF SUNSHINE

71

NORMAL

67

 

 

 

January Preview

January is the coldest month of the year in Denver.  The record low temperature for each day of the month is at least 10 degrees below zero.  In addition, it is not uncommon for the mercury to drop below the freezing mark every night of the month.  The coldest temperature ever recorded in Denver was 29 degrees below zero recorded on January 9th 1875.

Even though January is the coldest month of the year there is usually not an abundance of inclement weather.  It is the second driest month of the year in terms of total precipitation and only the 5th snowiest month.  An exception to this was in 1992 when 24.3 inches of snow fell during the month, making it the snowiest January in Denver history.

The weather during January is quite changeable which, to be honest, is a characteristic of just about any month in Denver.  Cold blasts of arctic air usually bring several light snows and sub-zero temperatures to the area.  On the other hand, Chinook winds that warm temperatures into the 50s and 60s are also common.  These winds may blow as high as 100 miles per hour in and near the foothills.  Chinooks are far more common than blizzards during January.

DENVER'S JANUARY CLIMATOLOGICALLY NORMAL

(NORMAL PERIOD 1971-2000)

 

 

TEMPERATURE

 

 

 

AVERAGE HIGH

43.2

AVERAGE LOW

15.2

MONTHLY MEAN

29.2

DAYS WITH HIGH 90 OR ABOVE

0

DAYS WITH HIGH 32 OR BELOW

7

DAYS WITH LOW 32 OR BELOW

30

DAYS WITH LOWS ZERO OR BELOW

4

 

 

PRECIPITATION

 

 

 

MONTHLY MEAN

0.51"

DAYS WITH MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION

6

AVERAGE SNOWFALL IN INCHES

7.7"

DAYS WITH 1.0 INCH OF SNOW OR MORE

2

 

 

MISCELLANEOUS AVERAGES

 

 

 

HEATING DEGREE DAYS

1111

COOLING DEGREE DAYS

0

WIND SPEED (MPH)

8.6

WIND DIRECTION

SOUTH

DAYS WITH THUNDERSTORMS

0

DAYS WITH DENSE FOG

1

PERCENT OF SUNSHINE POSSIBLE

71

 

 

EXTREMES

 

 

 

RECORD HIGH

76DEGREES ON 01/27/1888

RECORD LOW

-29 DEGREES ON 01/09/1875

WARMEST

40.3 DEGREES IN 1982

COLDEST

16.9 DEGREES IN 1930

WETTEST

2.35 INCHES IN 1883

DRIEST

0.01 IN 1933

SNOWIEST

24.3" INCHES in 1992

LEAST SNOWIEST

TR 1934, 2003

Sunrise/Sunset (Denver area)

     Date

Sunrise

Sunset

     Jan 1  

07:21

16:45

     Jan 5

07:21

16:48

     Jan 10

07:21

16:53

     Jan 15

07:19

16:58

     Jan 20

07:17

17:04

     Jan 25

07:14

17:09

     Jan 30

07:10

17:15

 Snowfall

October 2006 to April 2007

City

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan Feb Mar Apr

Seasonal Totals

Aurora (Central)

16.2 4.0 31.1         51.3

Castle Rock 4 NE

 22.5 5.5 49.8          77.5

Colorado Springs

6.1 3.5 8.3         19.4
Denver Stapleton  4.8 4.4 29.4         42.8

Denver Downtown

5.6 4.2 35.3         51.7

Golden

20.5 12.5 45.6         78.6

Highlands Ranch

19.0 5.0 42.0         66.0

Lakewood

13.3 5.0 32.0         50.3

Littleton

13.0 6.5 40.2         59.7

Louisville

 9.0 6.7 36.0         61.3

Parker

11.0 4.0 40.0         60.5

Sedalia - Hwy 67

13.0 4.5 38.8         66.8

Thornton

12.7 4.9 38.9         56.5

Westminster

13.9 5.3 40.4         59.6

Wheatridge

15.1 8.1 43.2         66.4