The Weather Wire

 

August 2007                                                                                                            Volume 15 Number 08

 

Contents

 

·   Risk Management

 
·   Safety Classes
 

·   Drought Monitor

 

·   July

    Summary

 

·   July Stats

 

·   August Preview

 

·   Sunrise/Sunset

 

·   Rain Totals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 2007

Avg High 91.6

Avg Low 61.1

Snow - 0.0"

Season Snow - 0.0"

Precipitation - 0.43"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

August

Avg High 86.0

Avg Low 57.4

Avg Snow -  0"

Avg Precip - 2.16"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skyview Weather 

2350 N Rocky View Rd

Castle Rock, CO 80108

 

Phone: (303) 688-9175

Fax: (303) 660-0548

 

E-mail:    

tim@skyview-wx.com

 

We’re on the Web!

http://www.skyview-wx.com/

 

Copyright 2007

Skyview Weather

Risk Management and Skyview Weather 

Risk management is defined as an activity that evaluates risks, and developments and implements  procedures that reduce or eliminate the exposure to harm and loss.   Or, put another way, it is the process of evaluating what can go wrong, and taking steps to prevent it. Predictable is preventable.

As an example of risk management, lets begin with the following chart:.

The 10 most dangerous jobs
Occupation Fatalities per 100,000  
Timber cutters 117.8  
Fishermen 71.1  
Pilots and navigators 69.8  
Structural metal workers 58.2  
Drivers-sales workers 37.9  
Roofers 37  
Electrical power installers 32.5  
Farm occupations 28  
Construction laborers 27.7  
Truck drivers 25  

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics; survey of occupations with minimum 30 fatalities and 45,000 workers in 2002.

Its not a surprise that timber cutters and fisherman top the list, but note the 10th item on the list, truck drivers.  Truck driving is a dangerous occupation, with 25 fatalities per 100,000 workers, and one of the occupations with the highest in numbers killed, with almost 600 drivers killed each year (in recent years).   Yet, when was the last time you heard of UPS having a driver killed.  No driver fatalities occurred in 2004.  Or 2003. Or 2002. Or 2001.  Lucky?  Hardly.  UPS has one of the most extensive risk management programs in America today, training drivers on everything from which foot to step down on, how to load a package, how to safely drive.  Clearly, risk management at UPS has been highly successful.  Risk management works!
 

An effective risk management plan requires several key items:

                                   Risk Identification and Evaluation

                                                        ||

                                      Risk Control and Education

                                                        ||

                                      Risk Monitoring and Reaction

The first step in any risk management plan is access the risks that apply in your organization.  Identifying hazards, and a review of the consequences and severity of the consequences if the event should take place must be reviewed. Only by having an understanding of the specific risks that your organization faces can steps be taken to reduce or eliminate those hazards.

Once risks have been identified, steps to reduce or eliminate the risk should be implemented.  Procedures and policies are reviewed and set up.  Once procedures are in place, education becomes critical.  The best procedures cannot be followed if no one knows of the procedures, and the proper steps to be taken once an event is occurring.  Education is even more critical with time sensitive events, when reaction time is of the essence.  Remember, identifiable risks are manageable risks!

The third step is risk monitoring.  Only by being aware of specific risks to your organization, and monitoring for that risk, can an organization properly react when the risk develops.

Many risks can be identified at a given location, from hazardous chemicals, to proper ladder placement, to fire mitigation issues.  Another hazard, both economically and physical, is weather hazards. With regard to weather hazards, Skyview Weather is in the risk management business, particularly with risk monitoring.  As you know, Skyview Weather monitors a variety of weather conditions, and updates clients with specific information regarding weather threats that are in or near their location. 

However, risk monitoring is just one part of an organizations risk management activities.  It has become apparent to us that organizations need to look at risk identification as well as risk control and education needs.  Skyview Weather can assist with both of these areas, working with our clients to identify weather risks to there facilities.  Although risk assessment is an ongoing process, it is particularly important to do an assessment prior to the higher risk seasons, for summer clients, winter is an excellent time to do an assessment.

Beyond risk assessments, Skyview Weather sees a critical need for risk control measures, and in particular, education.  Employees of an organization need to have regular training as to how to utilize information received by Skyview Weather with regard to risk monitoring.  Plans of action need to be understood, and designed, prior to an event.  In response to this critical need, Skyview Weather is in the process of designing a number of educational classes for both clients, and non clients alike.  More information on these classes will be coming soon.

Risk management activities are an ongoing process, and result in financial savings through mitigation of hazards, proper response to hazards, and a safer environment.  Although Skyview Weather cannot eliminate all risks associated with weather, through proper implementation of a risk management plan focusing on assessment, education, and operational monitoring, Skyview Weather can certainly assist your organization in reducing weather related risks.

Skyview Offers Safety Classes

As in many endeavors, awareness equals safety.  One component of awareness is education, and Skyview Weather has a number of educational classes intended to promote weather awareness and increased safety.  At this time, the following classes are available. We highly recommend these safety classes for your facility, please contact us for more information!

Basic Weather Safety - This 1 hour safety oriented class reviews basic weather safety, including flash flood safety, lightning safety, and tornado safety as well as reviewing NWS products, with specific emphasis on watches and warnings.

Basic Weather Safety and Severe Weather Spotting - This 3 hour class begins with basic weather safety, including flash flood safety, lightning safety, and tornado safety as well as reviewing NWS products, with specific emphasis on watches and warnings. Basic weather concepts  and basic weather spotting is included, with emphasis on thunderstorm features.

Basic Weather Safety for Coaches - This 60-90 minute safety oriented class is similar to Basic Weather Safety, but designed for coaches and other administrators that must determine whether to suspend or cancel outdoor sports events.  Heavy emphasis on lightning safety, as well as severe thunderstorm safety is presented. A review of NWS publicly disseminated products, including watches and warnings, is included. Basic weather safety, including flash flood safety, lightning safety, and tornado safety is discussed.

Extended Weather Safety and Spotting - As with the above classes, this all day class begins with basic weather safety, including flash flood safety, lightning safety, and tornado safety as well as reviewing NWS products, with specific emphasis on watches and warnings.  Basic weather concepts and definitions are discussed, with extensive time on the role of spotters, and key spotting features of developing severe storms. Video presentations are included as well.

Radar 101 - Everyone utilizes radar on the internet, but just what exactly are you looking at?  This 2 hour class answers that question, providing an introduction to radar,  a review of publicly available radar products on the internet, and how to interpret and utilize those products to your advantage.  This class is critical for those organizations attempting to use publicly available internet weather for client and employee safety.

Getting the most from Skyview Weather ... Client-Skyview interaction - This 2 hour class focuses on how existing clients of Skyview Weather can get the most from Skyview Weathers extensive services.  A review of what Skyview offers, product delivery, and Skyview Weather terms is presented.

All classes are presented using PowerPoint, and include handouts.  Questions are always welcome, and encourage..  Selected classes include video as well.  Please contact Skyview Weather for scheduling and pricing information.  As always, you can reach us at 303-688-9175 or via email at tim@skyview-wx.com .

Drought Update

The west slope of Colorado continued to see dry conditions, with little improvement in drought conditions.  The remainder of the state generally saw normal to above normal precipitation during July.

The map below shows forecasted temperature deviances for August 2007. As can be seen,  above average temperatures are expected for Western Colorado for August 2007, with Eastern areas of Colorado expected to have above normal temperatures.

The map below shows forecasted precipitation deviances for August 2007.  Normal precipitation is expected for  all of Colorado for August 2007.

As can be seen in the below map, little overall change is anticipated for much of Colorado through October, with the exception of far Southwest Colorado and a portion of Northeast Colorado where some improvement will occur

July Summary

A very strong and persistent upper level ridge of high pressure dominated the weather across northern Colorado during the first 3 weeks of July.  As a result July 2007 at DIA was one of the hottest and driest on record.  The average temperature for the month was 76.4 degrees which was 3.0 degrees above normal, which ties for the 9th warmest July on record.  There were 21 days in which the temperature equaled or exceeded 90 degrees and two days which reached the century mark.  On July 2nd DIA reached 100 degrees which tied a record for the date.  The second 100 degree day occurred on July 17th

The first 24 days of the month were extremely dry in which only 0.07 inches of precipitation fell (Again we should note that many areas of the Front Range has numerous thunderstorms and some areas had flooding conditions.  So this July was not dry for many areas) The month ended with 0.43 inches of precipitation which was 1.73 inches below normal, making this the 8th driest July on record.

July Stats

TEMPERATURE (IN DEGREES F)

 

 

 

 

 

 

AVERAGE MAX

91.6

NORMAL

88.0

DEPARTURE

3.6

AVERAGE MIN

61.1

NORMAL

58.7

DEPARTURE

2.4

MONTHLY MEAN

76.3

NORMAL

73.4

DEPARTURE

2.9

HIGHEST

100 on the 17th

LOWEST

52 on the 13th

 

 

 

 

 

 

DAYS WITH MAX 90 OR ABOVE

21

NORMAL

15

DAYS WITH MAX 32 OR BELOW

0

NORMAL

0

DAYS WITH MIN 32 OR BELOW

0

NORMAL

0

DAYS WITH MIN ZERO OR BELOW

0

NORMAL

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

TEMPERATURE RECORDS

 

Tied Record High of 100 on July 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HEATING DEGREE DAYS

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONTHLY TOTAL

0

NORMAL

1

DEPARTURE

-1

SEASONAL TOTAL

0

NORMAL

1

DEPARTURE

-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

COOLING DEGREE DAYS

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONTHLY TOTAL

359

NORMAL

261

DEPARTURE

98

YEARLY TOTAL

546

NORMAL

422

DEPARTURE

124

 

 

 

 

 

 

PRECIPITATION (IN INCHES)

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONTHLY TOTAL

0.43"

NORMAL

2.16"

DEPARTURE

-1.73"

YEARLY TOTAL

6.87"

NORMAL

10.25"

DEPARTURE

-3.38"

GREATEST IN 24 HOURS

0.28" on 27th

DAYS WITH MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION

6

 

 

 

*** Precipitation at DIA NOT representative of the rest of Metro Denver - See table below for other Denver area rainfall amounts.

 

SNOWFALL (IN INCHES)

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONTHLY TOTAL

0.0"

NORMAL

0.0"

DEPARTURE

0.0"

SEASONAL TOTAL

0.0"

NORMAL

0.0"

DEPARTURE

0.0"

GREATEST IN 24 HOURS

0.0"

GREATEST DEPTH

0"

 

 

 

 

 

 

WIND (IN MILES PER HOUR)

 

 

 

 

 

 

AVERAGE SPEED 8.6 from the south

PEAK WIND GUST

58mph from the N

 

 

 

 

 

 

MISCELLANEOUS WEATHER

 

 

 

 

 

 

NUMBER OF DAYS WITH THUNDERSTORMS

10

NORMAL

11

NUMBER OF DAYS WITH HEAVY FOG

0

NORMAL

0

NUMBER OF DAYS WITH HAIL

0

 

 

PERCENT OF SUNSHINE

75%

NORMAL

71%

 

 

 

August Preview

The weather pattern in August is similar to the rest of the summer months, but the severe weather decreases significantly.  Temperatures also toward the end of the month begin to decline.  Skies are generally clear between midnight and noon, but during the afternoon showers and thunderstorms develop along the foothills during the afternoon and then move eastward across the urban corridor.

The occurrence of severe weather decreases considerably during August compared to the severe weather months of June and July.  The typical air mass aloft over Denver is nearly as warm as earlier in the summer, however, the air mass is usually a bit cooler near the surface.  As a result, the air mass is more stable and therefore thunderstorms are less intense.  Tornadoes and large damaging hail are fairly rare, especially after the middle of August.  Because of slow movement, thunderstorms in August are more likely to produce heavy rain then large hail.

By late August, the days become noticeably shorter and an occasional cold front slips across Denver and brings a nip to the air.  A reminder that summer is really winding down.  There has never been any snowfall recorded in Denver during August.  August still brings in some hot days.  In fact, the highest temperature ever recorded in Denver was recorded during the month of August, 105 degrees on August 8, 1878.  This record was just tied on July 20th 2005.

DENVER'S AUGUST CLIMATOLOGICALLY NORMAL

(NORMAL PERIOD 1971-2000)

 

 

TEMPERATURE

 

 

 

AVERAGE HIGH

86.0

AVERAGE LOW

57.4

MONTHLY MEAN

71.7

DAYS WITH HIGH 90 OR ABOVE

9

DAYS WITH HIGH 32 OR BELOW

0

DAYS WITH LOW 32 OR BELOW

0

DAYS WITH LOWS ZERO OR BELOW

0

 

 

PRECIPITATION

 

 

 

MONTHLY MEAN

1.82"

DAYS WITH MEASURABLE PRECIPITATION

9

AVERAGE SNOWFALL IN INCHES

0

DAYS WITH 1.0 INCH OF SNOW OR MORE

0

 

 

MISCELLANEOUS AVERAGES

 

 

 

HEATING DEGREE DAYS

9

COOLING DEGREE DAYS

217

WIND SPEED (MPH)

8.0

WIND DIRECTION

SOUTH

DAYS WITH THUNDERSTORMS

8

DAYS WITH DENSE FOG

1

PERCENT OF SUNSHINE POSSIBLE

71

 

 

EXTREMES

 

 

 

RECORD HIGH

105 DEGREES ON 08/08/1878

RECORD LOW

40 DEGREES ON 08/26/1910

WARMEST

76.8 DEGREES IN 1937

COLDEST

66.5 DEGREES IN 1915

WETTEST

5.85" IN 1979

DRIEST

0.02" in 1924

SNOWIEST

0.0"

LEAST SNOWIEST

0.0"

Sunrise/Sunset (Denver area)

     Date

Sunrise

Sunset

     Aug 1  

05:58

20:14

     Aug 5

06:01

20:10

     Aug 10

06:06

20:04

     Aug 15

06:11

19:58

     Aug 20

06:15

19:51

     Aug 25

06:20

19:43

     Aug 30

06:25

19:36

 Rainfall

May 2007 to Sept 2007

City

May

June

July

August Sept

Seasonal Totals

Aurora (Central)

2.40" 0.75" 1.46"     4.61"
Brighton 1.14" 0.28" 1.65"     3.07"
Broomfield 2.17" 0.24" 0.91"     3.32"

Castle Rock 4 NE

2.14" 1.43" 2.61"     6.18"

Colorado Sprgs Airport

 2.35" 0.94" 1.74"     5.03"
Denver DIA  1.79" 0.52" 0.43"     2.74"

Denver Downtown

3.11" 0.63" 1.26"     5.00"

Golden

3.11" 0.67" 0.55"     4.33"

Highlands Ranch

2.64" 0.39" 1.38"     4.41"

Lakewood

 1.93" 0.83" 1.30"      4.09"

Littleton

 3.43" 1.02" 1.57"      6.02"

Parker

1.69" 0.55" 1.26"     3.50"

Sedalia - Hwy 67

 3.74" 0.98" 0.43"     5.15"

Thornton

 1.61" 0.31" 0.51"      2.43"

Westminster

 2.56" 0.47" 1.22"      4.25"

Wheatridge

 2.95" 0.52" 1.34"      4.81"